Renaissance Ultrasound Blog

March 26, 2010

Siemens S2000 Adds New Feature: Aids in Breast Cancer Detection

Women with dense breast tissue have been termed a technically-difficult patient in the past, but with the new Siemens S2000 ABVS scanner, this is no longer the case.  The innovative device is attached to the ultrasound system and is the world’s first device of its kind, capturing three-dimensional volume images of the breast, including a coronal view, which has not been available with conventional ultrasound.

The system is well-versed in completing a comprehensive breast exam from physician palpation, to scanning with elastography, to capturing 3D volume images, to conducting biopsies.  Siemens S2000 ABVS user, Dr. Frank Stöblen, has stated “The system application is extremely flexible. I can immediately follow-up with a manual examination after an automatic image acquisition or use the system for a biopsy if necessary.”

Advances in technology and in this case, conducting breast screening exams, decreases patient anxiety and increases turn around time for diagnoses.  Patient care is improving when the coronal display of the breast Volume images provide an even better overview of the anatomy and architecture of the breast tissue than earlier techniques. These 3D images are now able to display the coronal view of the breast (from the nipple to the breast wall) in slices. This view simplifies and accelerates the diagnosis.

To receive on-site training for breast imaging or ultrasound system training, click on the link to learn more at RenaissanceUltrasound.

Siemens S2000 ABVS

Advertisements

March 18, 2010

SonoSite’s NanoMaxx and GE’s Venue Ultrasound Systems

Filed under: Anesthesia,GE Ultrasound,Portable Ultrasound,SonoSite — Leslie @ 4:19 pm
Tags:

It seems like yesterday when I first plugged in my computer and connected to AOL, I can still hear the unmistakable sound of connection as a new world opened up.  As technology in our computers and cell phones change daily, so does the technology in ultrasound.  Sure some of the systems are smaller and faster, but do they truly provide the same diagnostic accuracy as their big brothers?

Behold the SonoSite  NanoMaxx ultrasound system which, according to the company, “is an extremely portable, high-resolution imaging tool that provides point-of-care visualization to a variety of medical specialties. Empowering physicians to meet the highest standard of patient care, the NanoMaxx system targets applications that will improve patient safety and minimize complications. With one-dial control, advanced proprietary imaging algorithms, a 20 second boot-up time, and a rugged form factor (successfully drop-tested from three feet), the NanoMaxx system is a breakthrough technology that truly meets an unmet clinical need.”

Although SonoSite has been the leader in portable ultrasound systems, GE’s Venue(TM) ultrasound system is like an a la carte diagnostic device: Choose your desired modality and you are off and running.  The system is without a keyboard and instead contains a USB and SM card so that the clinician can plug in the probe, scan, review results.  The portable ultrasound system was designed for vascular, anesthesia, interventional,  musculoskeletal  and point of care modalities.

There is definitely a need for the light-weight and portable in a point of care environment, time will tell how these mighty systems compare to the dinosaurs before them.

SonoSite Nanomaxx


GE Venue 40


Learn more at www.SonoSite.com and www.GeHealthcare.com

March 17, 2010

Toshiba’s Aplio MX Debuts at ACC 2010

Filed under: Ultrasound — Leslie @ 12:48 pm

Although Toshiba is not considered one of the Big 3, they deserve some kudos for their technology, being in the business of  providing training for system-specific ultrasound equipment, my clinical team who used to work for Toshiba, has taught me to have a great sense of respect and appreciation for those scanning with the Toshiba systems.  The training process is not as straight-forward as some, each unit is highly customizable to the unique imaging and reading style of the clinicians utilizing it.

Toshiba showcased their latest innovation in cardiac capabilities on both the Aplio MX(tm) and the Aplio Artida(tm).

According to Business Wire, “Features of the Aplio MX include:

  • Contrast Harmonics to provide the ability to use bubble based contrast agents that help to provide better tissue definition on difficult-to-image patients during echocardiograms.
  • Differential Tissue Harmonic Imaging for the better imaging of difficult-to-image patients, like bariatric, without sacrificing resolution to give superior border and tissue definition.
  • ApliPure+ to enhance both image clarity and detail definition with real-time compounding technology to simultaneously perform spatial and frequency compounding during transmitting and receiving.
  • Advanced Dynamic Flow to provide color Doppler imaging at an unprecedented level and show flow with directional information for even the smallest vessels.
  • Tissue Doppler Imaging Quantification (TDIQ) software to perform various analyses by Angle Corrected Displacement and Strain to measure myocardial viability.

Toshiba’s Aplio Artida ultrasound system offers the power of 4D imaging in an everyday clinical setting. Artida offers advanced quantitative analysis tools with the world’s first 3D Wall Motion Tracking. 3D Wall Motion Tracking allows sonographers and physicians to quickly and accurately identify wall motion defects and the timing of cardiac events. This greatly improves the detection of wall motion abnormalities in many cardiac disease states and Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (CRT), and helps physicians optimize pacemaker settings.

Using Artida’s real-time, multi-planar reformatting capabilities, physicians can assess global and regional LV function, including volumetric LV ejection fraction. Arbitrary views of the heart, not available in 2D imaging, are also obtained to help with surgical planning. The 3D Wall Motion Tracking features from Toshiba allow the user to obtain angle-independent, global and regional information about myocardial contraction.”

To read more click here

March 12, 2010

Upcoming Ultrasound Tradeshows

Ahhhh, the sound of happy feet not having to support me for 8 hours while standing in the trade show booth greeting and educating customers on the latest and greatest innovations.  It’s kind of hard to explain why our technology was so much better than the competition’s when they essentially were the same – ugh.

Now I travel to network my company, Renaissance Ultrasound, and learn about the new technologies so that I can ensure my team is up to date.  Kudos to those writing and submitting clinical papers!

Here’s a list of some of the upcoming tradeshows over the next few months – hope to see you there!


SIR Society of Interventional Radiology March 14-17 Tampa, FL
ACC American College of Cardiology March 14-16 Atlanta, GA
AIUM American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine March 24-27 San Diego, CA
SPA Society of Pediatric Anesthesiology April 16-17 San Antonio, TX
AMSSM American Medical Society for Sports Medicine April 17-20 Cancun, Mexico
ACP American College of Physicians April 22-24 Toronto, Canada
ASRA American Society of Regional Anesthesia April 22-25 Toronto, Canada
ASBS American Society of Breast Surgeons April 29-May 1 Las Vegas, NV

March 6, 2010

Ultrasound System Training – Who Needs it?

So… somebody decided to purchase a refurbished ultrasound system (better known as used equipment), it was within the budget, it came with a 90 day warranty, and the user thought “How hard can this be? I’ve been scanning for years with a different system, but they’re all the same, right?” Well, no, not really.  I think that buying an ultrasound system from a reputable reseller is often a good idea when budgets are tight, it’s kind of like buying a new vs. a used car, new things drop in value as soon as they are bought so often you can get a relatively new ultrasound system for a great price.  However, if you buy a system that nobody has scanned on before you are not maximizing that investment and getting the most out of its features.

Many of the systems have the same types of general features such as image optimization, but do you know where that knob/button is and how best to utilize it to capture the image?  What about the DICOM features on the system?  What about learning how to start doing aortas or stress in a cardiology practice?  What if you are now scanning on a different version (we call them revision levels) of an ultrasound system, do you know what’s the same or what has changed?

Take me to Renaissance System Training!

Nobody has time to sit down and read the manual (if you even got one with your system delivery), so rely on an expert to come to your site and teach you about that newly acquired ultrasound system so that you can begin taking better images resulting in better diagnoses.

Now… if only someone could show me how to change the clock in my used SUV…

Blog at WordPress.com.